All Hazards Incident Management Teams (AHIMT)

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All-Hazards Incident Management Teams

The Mission

To provide a coordinated multi-disciplined approach to the management of minor, major, or catastrophic disasters and large-scale or complex incidents and preplanned events that will improve the ability of state and local emergency management personnel to prepare and implement emergency management plans and programs.

1. An application packet can be obtained from:
(A) A member of the closest Regional AHIMT Coordinating Committee.
(B) The Incident Commander of the closest Regional Incident Management Team.

2. If applying for more than one position, you must submit a separate application for each position.

3. The application packet must be completed in its entirety, scanned as Adobe “pdf” files, and emailed to the appropriate Coordinating Committee for the East, Middle, or West team. If the email or any one file is over 23-megabytes then divide into two or more emails or files. The email addresses are below.

4. A complete application package must include scans of all five of the following documents:
(A) Completed “Tennessee Regional All Hazards Incident Management Teams Application.”
(B) Current resume detailing your overall work experience and education in the ICS position you are applying for.
(C) Narrative (one-page maximum) explaining your interest, experience, and education in the ICS position you are applying for.
(D) Photocopies of the FEMA Incident Command System and any other applicable courses completed.
(E) Letter of support from the head of your organization or governing body which states that they understand the Tennessee AHIMT program, agree that you will serve on the AHIMT for at least three years following completion of your training, understand that you will be placed on a rotating call roster and will support you in attending required meetings, training, exercises, drills and disaster deployments.

5. The appropriate regional coordinating committee will review the application and either approve or deny the application.
(A) The regional coordinating committee may conduct interviews to establish compatibility with the AHIMT program.

6. An approved application will be forwarded to the AHIMT Training, Education, and Membership (TEM) Committee for review and concurrence.

7. Applicants approved by the TEM will be forwarded to the Governance Committee (GC) for final concurrence.

8. The Governance Committee secretary will notify the applicant, the regional Coordinating Committee members, and the appropriate Regional AHIMT Incident Commander of the application status.

Completed application or questions regarding the application should be submitted to the Regional AHIMT Committee Chair or Regional AHIMT Coordinating Committee Representative.

West Team Regional Chair:                     John Selberg jselberg@germantown-tn.gov

Middle Team Regional Chair:                 Mark Foulks mfoulks@murfreesborotn.gov

East Team Regional Chair:                      Donnie Shular dshular@seviervilletn.org

AHIMT Committee Representative:     Kevin Lauer kevin.lauer@tn.gov

West Regional AHIMT

John Selberg                     jselberg@germantown-tn.gov            

Middle Regional AHIMT

Mark Foulks                     mfoulks@murfreesborotn.gov

Jamie Bigelow                  jbigelow@murfreesborotn.gov

Joe Bell                               jbell@murfreesborotn.gov

East Regional AHIMT

Donnie Shular                 shulard@seviervilletn.org     

Credentialing and Qualification Committee

Jim Bean                             jim.bean@sullivancountytn.gov

Training, Education, and Membership Committee

Glenn Johnson                 glennj@franklintn.gov    

Program Support Contacts

Ryan Thompson              ryan.thompson@tn.gov

 

The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) phase of implementing position(s) into the TIMQS is achieved by recognizing the previously existing qualifications and experience personnel already possess. The RPL process does not apply to the physical/medical fitness or currency qualification criteria.

The TIMQS uses a performance-based RPL process to assess an individual’s prior experiences and training to determine competency in a position. This is based on the principle that the candidate has already performed the job or performed in a position very similar to the one desired. The RPL process enables an individual to provide documentation of their experiences, training, and knowledge and, if necessary, is confirmed with an interview panel consisting of SMEs or credentialed individuals.

Personnel who wish to have their previously obtained or existing Incident Command System qualifications recognized must complete and submit a Tennessee All-Hazards Incident Management Team (AHIMT) Program Application for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL Application) prior to the closing date indicated on the application or instruction letter.

RPL will remain open until July 1st, 2022 and only open again for new team positions and individual applications from personnel who have moved to the State of Tennessee from another jurisdiction.
 

The processes in this section qualify incident management personnel into existing ICS positions after the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) phase of the TIMQS qualifications program has ended.

The performance-based approach of TIMQS focuses on a candidate’s performance of specific tasks identified within the Position Task Book (PTB) for that position, while being observed and evaluated by individuals who have been recognized as qualified evaluators. The PTB provides a method to document satisfactory completion of tasks during appropriate qualifying incidents, events, job activities, qualifying exercises, and/or classroom activities as permitted within the PTB documentation. At least two (two is the minimum) or more qualifying incidents, events, job activities, or qualifying exercises must be shown in the evaluation documentation.

The following steps enable an individual to become certified as qualified and then credentialed for an ICS position. These steps, and the individuals or committees responsible, are as follows:

1) Individual discusses their desire to train for a new/higher position with employing or sponsoring entity or AHIMT leadership. On concurrence of supervisor, the Position Candidate notifies TEMC of their desire to train for a new NIMS ICS position by submitting an RCCS signed by their employing or sponsoring supervisor.

2) The Secretary of the TEMC ensures all members have received the submitted RCCS forms.

3) The Chair of the TEMC oversees the overall training process and the prioritization of individual requests to initiate the trainee process.
    a) The TEMC maintains lists of personnel credentialed in each position, the trainees and their status, and informs the other committees of any needed recruitment to maintain depth.

    b) If accepted, the Trainee is notified by the Secretary to initiate the process.

4) Position Candidate applies for, attends, and completes prerequisite training and attains any prerequisite qualifications. The Position Candidate completes NIMS Core Curriculum specific to their level and attains any prerequisite experience and/or qualification criteria for the position as identified in the respective PQR.

5) Position Candidate completes the Required Training as identified in the appropriate PQR.

6) Once the Position Candidate starts their required training, a PTB for the target position the individual is working towards is initiated by the Chair of the TEMC or their designee. Position Candidates who have initiated PTBs are identified as “Trainees” for the position and are permitted to function as trainees on qualifying incidents and events.

7) Position Candidate gains experience and completes PTB. Experience is gained and performance is evaluated while completing the initiated PTB.

8) After the Final Evaluation opportunity, the Final Evaluator should ensure the PTB is completely signed off on and the appropriate documentation in the PTB is completed.

9) The Position Candidate assembles their application, incident and event records, and documentation as directed in the application instructions, and other materials needed to complete the Request for Change of Credential Status (RCCS) form. The Position Candidate should retain a photocopy or electronic scan for their records.

10) The RCCS Form and application package are sent to the CQC for their review process.

11) The Secretary of the TEMC ensures all members have received the submitted RCCS forms and application packages.
    a) The CQC, with assistance from SMEs if needed, use the criteria on the Application Review Checklist to review and evaluate the application and all supporting documents to determine that the position trainee has completed all the position qualification criteria delineated in the PQR and is eligible for the new position.

    b) Documents may include training course records and certificates, PTBs, resumes, experience documentation, incident personnel performance ratings, Physical Fitness Validation Form from the employing or sponsoring entity, and other materials the CQC deems necessary to establish eligibility.

    c) If the documentation meets the criteria on the Application Review Checklist, the CQC recommends the applicant be qualified and documents this on the checklist and RCCS form.

    d) If the documentation does not meet the criteria on the Application Review Checklist, the CQC secretary documents the reason(s) on the Checklist and RCCS form and returns the application package to the applicant.

12) Application packages, including the Checklist and RCCS form that recommend approval, are forwarded to the GC Secretary.

13) The GC Secretary ensures all GC members have the documentation package(s).

14) Following the CG review process, the CG reviews the application package for concurrence.
    a) The GC either recommends or denies the Position Candidate’s request for certification.

    b) If denied, the GC Chair completes the denial section of the Application Review Checklist and returns it to the CQC Secretary for review, discussion, and disposition between the committees.

    c) If certification is approved, the Secretary ensures the completed application package and signed RCCS are sent to the Credentialing Official (CO).

15) The CO signs the credential, notifies the applicant, and issues the applicant a new/revised Qualifications Card with a Congratulations Form Letter.

16) The CO files/stores the application package for archiving and compliance.
 

Qualifications System-Related Definitions


1. Appeals Subcommittee

The Appeals Subcommittee is a three-member subcommittee appointed by the Credentialing and Qualifications Committee Chair for the purpose of reviewing appeals under Section VII(D), Appeals.

2. Authority Having Jurisdiction

The Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) is an organization, office, or individual having statutory responsibility for enforcing the requirements of a code or standard or for approving equipment, materials, and installation or a procedure. For the specific purposes of this Guide, the relevant AHJ is the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency. Other references to AHJ will note a qualifier such as “state” or “local” AHJ, if necessary.

3. Behavior

A description of an observable activity or action that groups together similar tasks necessary to perform the specific activity. See also Competency and Task.

4. Certification

The process of authoritatively attesting that individuals meet qualifications established for incident management or support functions and are, therefore, qualified for specific positions. Certification of personnel ensures personnel possess a minimum level of training, experience, physical and medical fitness, and capability appropriate for a particular position.

5. Certifying Official

The Certifying Official is the official who has the authority for reviewing and evaluating documentation, and confirming the completion of relevant position requirements, and determining if the trainee should be granted certification. The Director of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), as the Certifying Official, has delegated responsibility for certification to the Governance Committee.

6. Credentialing Official

The Credentialing Official is the individual who has authority to sign and issue individual Incident Qualification Cards and/or other credentials after approval of the Certifying Official and maintain records of what qualifications the employees in that organization hold. The Tennessee Team Development Manager has been delegated the responsibility of the Credentialing Official.

7. Coach/Trainer

A Coach/Trainer is an individual that provides instructions and mentoring to a trainee, whether in the classroom, on the job, planned event, or on an incident. The Coach/Trainer must be qualified in the position they are coaching or supervise that position in the ICS system. The coach should not perform the duties of the Evaluator at the same time, ensuring the integrity of the qualifications system is preserved. The TIMQS encourages the use of Coach/Trainers qualified under NWCG, U.S. Coast Guard, or other recognized qualification systems if TIMQS-qualified Coach/Trainers are not available.

8. Competency

Competency refers to a broad description that groups together the behaviors necessary to perform a specific function. Competencies are a national benchmark and are agreed to by major ICS training organizations. These competencies form the basis for position-specific training, Position Task Books (PTB), job aids, and other performance-based documents. See also Task and Behavior.

9. Credentialing

Credentialing is the process of providing documentation that identifies personnel and authenticates and verifies their qualification for a particular ICS position.

10. Credentialing Authority

The person or organization that has the authority to credential personnel for a specific entity or organization. In Tennessee, this is the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA).

11. Criteria

A listing within the position qualifications that includes the minimum criteria that a trainee must meet for qualification.

12. Credentialing and Qualifications Committee (CQC)

The Credentialing and Qualifications Committee, a committee established by the Tennessee All-Hazards Incident Management Team Governance Committee Charter, is responsible for the establishment and management of the process to ensure members meet nationally accepted standards for NIMS ICS positions. See Section IV(B), Credentialing and Qualification Committee.

13. Currency

Successful performance on a qualifying incident, event, or exercise in a position or associated position for which an individual is qualified, at least once within the Currency Interval indicated in the Position Qualification Requirements, during a qualifying incident, event, or exercise. See Section VII, Maintenance, Loss of Certification, Decertification, and Recertification.

14. Decertification

A process whereby an individual’s position(s) qualifications or credentials are removed, making him/her ineligible for deployment in that position.

15. Direct Entry

ICS positions that have no requirements for gaining qualification in a subordinate position are referred to as “Direct Entry” positions. The Direct Entry process permits personnel to be qualified for certain supervisory positions without previously obtaining any subordinate position qualifications. The AHIMTA PTBs have been designed to complement the Direct Entry process by including the performance of certain critical skills of the subordinate positions to ensure the Direct Entry position possesses the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to function properly. See Section C of Appendix B, Direct Entry Positions at the Type 3 Level.

16. Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC)

The Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), established in 1996, is a congressionally ratified interstate mutual aid compact that provides a legal structure by which states affected by a catastrophe may request emergency assistance from other states.

17. Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

The physical location where the coordination of information and resources normally takes place to support incident management (on-scene operations) activities. An EOC may be a temporary facility or located in a more central or permanently established facility, perhaps at a higher level of organization within an entity.

18. Endorsements

Knowledge and skills in a specific discipline that have been identified and demonstrated as needed to manage an incident involving that discipline (e.g., hazardous materials, wildland fire, Urban Search and Rescue) may require approval or an endorsement by the organization that has identified the additional knowledge and skills necessary. In most cases, these situations may be solved through the recruitment and use of Technical Specialists. There may, however, be situations where an industry association, governmental organization or group, professional or discipline specific, non-profit, or TEMA identifies the need to add discipline or hazard-specific requirements over and above the criteria found in the TIMQS PQRs. The application and use of endorsements are in the developmental stage.

19. Entity

Entity or its plural form entities: These are all-encompassing terms used to describe the various types of political subdivisions (local, state, tribal, territorial, insular area, territories, provinces, parishes, and Federal Governments) or non-governmental and private-sector companies that may have NIMS ICS-qualified individuals or sponsor an All-Hazards Incident Management Team.

20. Equivalency

An alternate education, training, course, exercise, or experience that is determined to be equivalent to an existing education, training, course, exercise, or experience. Equivalency is determined by the AHJ.

21. Evaluator

An Evaluator is an individual that is responsible for evaluating a trainee using a Position Task Book (PTB). The Evaluator must be qualified in the position they are evaluating or be qualified in a position that supervises that position in the ICS. Also see #22, Final Evaluator.

22. Final Evaluator

The Final Evaluator is the Evaluator who signs the verification statement at the front of the PTB after all tasks have been completed, and by signing is recommending the trainee for certification. The Final Evaluator must be qualified and proficient in the position being evaluated. For a more detailed description, see Section IX (E), Coach/Evaluator and Final Evaluator Qualifications.

23. Governance Committee (GC)

The Governance Committee is a committee established by the Tennessee All-Hazards Incident Management Team Governance Committee Charter. See Section IV(A), Governance Committee.

24. Hazardous Materials Training

Several levels of hazardous materials training are defined by OSHA and are required training for incident responders. Definitions of the levels are defined in Section III, Components of the Qualification System, and requirements for individual responders are listed in Appendix B, Position Qualification Requirements.

25. Historical Recognition (HR)

Historical Recognition is the process of recognizing an individual’s past experience or qualifications as equivalent to the current criteria found in the position qualification criteria for a position. The Historical Recognition process outlined in the FEMA NQS has been enhanced with additional elements of the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process outlined in the IIMQS and is referred to as the RPL process within TIMQS. During implementation of the overall program, or when ICS positions are subsequently added to the PQR in this Guide and determined necessary by the GC, the RPL process will be used. See Section V, Initiating the Qualifications Process – Recognition of Prior Learning.

26. HSEEP Exercise(s)

The Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) provides a set of guiding principles for exercise programs, as well as a common approach to exercise program management, design and development, conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning.

a) Full-Scale Exercise (FSE)
    A Full-Scale Exercise (FSE) is typically the most complex and resource-intensive type of exercise. It combines the     interactivity of the functional exercise with the field element involving real (not artificial or synthetic) responders     working in real time. It involves multiple agencies, organizations, and entities and validates many facets of     preparedness. An FSE often includes many players operating under cooperative systems such as the Incident     Command System or Unified Command.
b) Functional Exercise (FE)
    Functional Exercises (Fes) are designed to validate and evaluate capabilities, multiple functions and/or sub-functions, or     interdependent groups of functions. An FE does not involve any “boots on the ground” (i.e., first responders or     emergency officials responding to an incident in real time). An FE typically focuses on exercising plans, policies,     procedures, and staff members involved in management, direction, and command and control functions. In an FE,     events are projected through an exercise scenario with event updates that drive activity at the management level. An FE     is conducted in a realistic, real-time environment; however, movement of personnel and equipment is usually     simulated.

27. Incident Complexity

Incident complexity is a characterization used to describe the level of difficulty, severity, or overall resistance to control, that incident management personnel face while trying to manage an incident or event to a successful and safe conclusion or to manage one type of incident compared to another type. See Appendix A, Incident Complexity.

28. Incident Training Specialist

An individual assigned to an incident (usually within the Planning Section) to identify evaluation opportunities; assist trainees, Coaches/Trainers, and Evaluators with proper documentation; conduct progress reviews; and answer qualifications questions as needed. The Training Specialist works with the Incident Management Team to ensure any trainees have qualified Coach/Trainers or Evaluators that can make an accurate and honest appraisal of a trainee’s performance. The Training Specialist may issue a PTB after approval from the individual’s employing or sponsoring entity.

29. Interstate Incident Management Qualification System (IIMQS)

The standard developed by the AHIMTA for qualifying personnel in ICS positions associated with the Type 3 resource typing level. In the future, Type 2 and Type 1 resource typing levels will be included for mobilization across state borders. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency has adopted the IIMQS standard and incorporated it into the TIMQS.

30. NIMS Core Curriculum

NIMS training develops incident personnel capable of performing necessary functions in their entity or organization, as well as assisting when mutual aid is necessary. NIMS Core Curriculum training courses are those courses identified in the most recently published NIMS Training Program document. The courses are a requirement for all NIMS ICS field positions. The NIMS Core Curriculum is progressive, adding additional courses as the individual assumes a higher degree of leadership and responsibility. For all responders, the IS-100 and IS-700 courses are required; for incident personnel with leadership responsibilities, the IS-200 and IS-800 courses are added; for incident personnel designated as leaders or supervisors, the ICS-300 and ICS-400, and other courses identified within the document are required. The NIMS Core course requirements are listed in Appendix B, Position Qualification Requirements.

31. National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG)

The National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) provides national leadership to enable interoperable wildland fire operations among Federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial partners. NWCG facilitates implementation of approved standards, guidelines, qualifications, and training under NIMS-ICS principles.

32. Operational Period

The period of time established for execution of a given set of operation actions as specified by the Incident Commander. Operational Periods can be of various lengths, although usually not over 24 hours.

33. Participating Agency

Participating Agency is an entity (state, local, tribal, nonprofit, or private organization) that has executed an agreement with a Sponsoring Agency to participate in an AHIMT.

34. Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness refers to the fitness levels responders are required to meet to be considered sufficiently physically fit to deploy to incidents and events. The TIMQS delegates responsibility to the entity that employs or sponsors the responder, the responsibility for using the provided guidelines to establish physical fitness standards, to apply appropriate testing methods to validate physical fitness, and for monitoring and certifying the fitness of their personnel credentialed under the TIMQS. See Section III(C), Physical/Medical Fitness for overall physical fitness guidance and Appendix B, Position Qualification Requirements for the individual physical fitness requirements for each ICS position.

35. Position Performance Assignment

(also called a “Trainee Assignment”)
An assignment of an individual on an incident or qualifying exercise that is working as a trainee with an open Position Task Book in the position for which the individual is working towards certification. The trainee is being actively trained or coached by a Coach/Evaluator in a position during an assignment, or is actually performing the task under the supervision of a qualified individual while completing the task identified in the Position Task Book and being evaluated for the required experience to become certified. See Appendix B, Position Qualification Requirements.

36. Position Qualification Requirements (PQRs)

The Position Qualification Requirements (PQRs) contain the specific criteria for each position. The requirements are the guides for determining which Training, Experience, Physical/Medical Fitness, and Currency are necessary for an individual to be considered qualified in that position. See Appendix B, Position Qualification Requirements.

37. Position Task Book (PTB)

A document that describes the minimum competencies, behaviors, and tasks to qualify or recertify for a position and documents a trainee’s performance of given tasks. The use of the AHIMTA PTBs is incorporated into the TIMQS.

38. Position Task Book Initiation

The action of formally issuing a Position Task Book to a trainee under the guidelines in the TIMQS.

39. Prerequisite Training

Training an individual must be complete before they can be certified in a position. (Training may be completed before a PTB is initiated or during the PTB evaluation process.)

40. Prerequisite Qualification

Required Qualification(s) an individual must possess or obtain before a PTB can be initiated.

41. Qualification

The process of enabling personnel to perform the duties of specific positions and documenting their demonstration of the capabilities and competencies that those positions require.

42. Qualification Review Committee

The Qualification Review Committee (QRC), is a committee that may be delegated the responsibilities of the Certifying Official. In Tennessee, the Director of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), as the Certifying Official, delegated the QRC/QRC responsibilities for certification within NQS and IIMQS to the Governance Committee.

43. Qualifying Exercise

An exercise or simulation meeting the requirements contained in Section X, Qualifying Incident, Event, and Exercise Guidelines. Personnel filling incident management positions during an exercise meeting the requirements of a Qualifying Exercise may be able to use the exercise opportunity to complete tasks in their Position Task Books or meet currency requirement to maintain qualification.

44. Qualifying Incident/Event

An incident or event that meets the incident complexity, duration of time, and relevancy to the ICS position requirements that are necessary to provide sufficient opportunity for the individual to exercise the roles and responsibilities of the ICS position they are filling. See Section X, Qualifying Incident, Event, and Exercise Guidelines.

45. Recertification

A process wherein the AHJ determines what training, tasks, or experience an individual must perform to requalify or have their qualification for a position reinstated.

46. Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

Recognition of Prior Learning is a performance-based evaluation process to assess an individual’s prior experiences and training to determine competency in a position. This is based on the premise that the candidate has already performed the job or performed in a position very similar to the one desired. RPL is the process whereby an individual provides documentation of their experiences, training, and knowledge and, if necessary, is confirmed with an interview panel consisting of subject matter experts (SMEs) or credentialed individuals. The Historical Recognition process outlined in the FEMA NQS has been combined with additional elements of the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process outlined in the IIMQS and is referred to as the RPL process within TIMQS. See Section V, Initiating the Qualifications Process – Recognition of Prior Learning.

47. Recognition of Prior Learning Peer Review Committee (RPLPRC)

The Credentialing and Qualifications Committee will fill the role of a Recognition of Prior Learning Peer Review Committee (RPLPRC) and will review and make a recommendation that an individual has completed the necessary training and experience and qualifies to be certified in a specific ICS position. The Credentialing and Qualifications Committee may defer to one or more SMEs to assist in executing its responsibilities.

48. Recommended Training

Training that is not required to be completed in order to qualify for a position but is recommended to support the position. This training is identified as a recommendation that may guide an individual to increase knowledge and/or skills. This may be acquired through on-the-job training, work experience, or training. Recommended training is a means by which personnel can prepare for position performance evaluation by obtaining specific knowledge and skills required to perform tasks identified in the PTB.

49. Recommending Official

The Recommending Official is the appropriate member of the Governance Committee who is recommending the candidate be certified and has the support of the sponsoring organization and is confirming the trainee’s completion of the position requirements. The recommendation is made to the other members of the Governance Committee.

50. Regional Coordinating Committees

Regional Coordinating Committees (RCCs) are committees established to assist the Sponsoring Agency of a regional AHIMT in carrying out their management and administrative duties. Each RCC consists of 3–7 members with representatives from the Participating Agencies who are members of that region’s AHIMT. The Sponsoring Agency (or their representative) chairs the committee.

51. Revocation

The cancellation of certification and withdrawal of credentialing documents from personnel no longer authorized to possess them.

52. Single Resource

An individual qualified in an ICS position that is not a rostered member of an AHIMT. Single Resources are used by AHIMTs to fill vacancies in rostered AHIMTs, fill requests for additional personnel on an incident or event, or augment existing capability.

53. Sponsoring Agency

A Sponsoring Agency is an entity that has assumed the administrative, programmatic, and operational management of an AHIMT participating in the State of Tennessee’s AHIMT program.

54. Task

A description of an action or activity needed to successfully perform in a position. Trainees must demonstrate completion of required tasks during the performance of a behavior. See also Competency and Behavior.

55. Task Code

A code used in the PTB and associated with the situation where the task may be completed. The situations range from actual on-incident experience to qualifying training exercises to related daily job tasks. The task codes and associated situations are defined in Section IX, Position Task Books.

56. Technical Specialists

Technical Specialists are personnel with specialized skills gained through educational degree programs or industry training of established standards. These personnel usually perform the same duties during an incident that they perform in their regular job and may have supplemental training to use their specialized skills in the incident environment.
Technical Specialists are typically certified in their fields or professions. No specific ICS qualifications are established for Technical Specialists within TIMQS.

57. Trainee (The Individual)

An individual approved by their employing or sponsoring entity who is preparing to qualify for an ICS position is credentialed as a trainee in that position once prerequisites are met and the Position Task Book (PTB) has been initiated. A trainee is eligible for formal, on-the-job training. A Position Candidate will not be assigned as a trainee on an interstate or inter-regional incident or event unless the individual has been identified as a trainee with an initiated PTB.

58. Training, Education, and Membership Committee (TEMC)

The Training, Education, and Membership Committee, a committee established by the GC, is responsible for creation of training standards and standardization of membership, recruitment, retention, Initiating PTBs, and continuing education requirements of AHIMT members in support of the overall program. See Section IV(C), Training, Education, and Membership Committee.

59. Training Officer

Within the context of this Guide, the Training Officer is the person who is monitoring the training and qualifications of individuals who are pursuing qualification or are fully qualified. The Training Officer may be from the employing or sponsoring entity or from another entity that has been delegated authority to provide the administrative management of the individual’s training and qualifications records.
 

General FAQ's:

What is the National Incident Management System (NIMS)?
NIMS is a comprehensive, national approach to incident management that is applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines. It is intended to:
• Be applicable across a full spectrum of potential incidents, hazards, and impacts, regardless of size, location or complexity.
• Improve coordination and cooperation between public and private entities in a variety of incident management activities.
• Provide a common standard for overall incident management.

Why do we need NIMS?
NIMS provides a consistent nationwide framework and approach to enable government at all levels (Federal, State, tribal, and local), the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to work together to prepare for, prevent, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the effects of incidents regardless of the incident’s cause, size, location, or complexity.

Consistent application of NIMS lays the groundwork for efficient and effective responses, from a single agency fire response to a multiagency, multijurisdictional natural disaster or terrorism response. Entities that have integrated NIMS into their planning and incident management structure can arrive at an incident with little notice and still understand the procedures and protocols governing the response, as well as the expectations for equipment and personnel.
NIMS provides commonality in preparedness and response efforts that allow diverse entities to readily integrate and, if necessary, establish unified command during an incident.

What are the Components of NIMS?
NIMS Components link together and work in unison to form a comprehensive incident management system. NIMS Components include:
• Preparedness
• Communications and Information Management
• Resource Management
• Command and Management
• Ongoing Management and Maintenance

To whom does NIMS apply?
NIMS is applicable to State, tribal and local governments, private sector organizations, critical infrastructure owners and operators, nongovernmental organizations and other organizations with an active role in emergency management and incident response. Elected and appointed officials, who are responsible for jurisdictional policy decisions, must also have a clear understanding of their emergency management roles and responsibilities to better serve their constituency.

How does NIMS relate to the National Response Framework (NRF)?
The NIMS and NRF are companion documents and are designed to improve the Nation’s incident management and response capabilities. While NIMS provides the template for the management of incidents regardless of size, scope or cause, the NRF provides the structure and mechanisms for national level policy of incident response. Together, the NIMS and the NRF integrate the capabilities and resources of various governmental jurisdictions, incident management and emergency response disciplines, non-governmental organizations, and the private-sector into a cohesive, coordinated, and seamless national framework for domestic incident response.

How does NIMS relate to local incident command?
A basic premise of NIMS is that all incidents begin and end locally. NIMS does not take command away from State and local authorities. NIMS simply provides the framework to enhance the ability of responders, including the private sector and NGOs, to work together more effectively. The Federal Government supports State and local authorities when their resources are overwhelmed or anticipated to be overwhelmed. Federal departments and agencies respect the sovereignty and responsibilities of local, tribal, and State governments while rendering assistance. The intention of the Federal Government in these situations is not to command the response, but rather to support the affected local, tribal, and/or State governments.

What is Command and Management?
The Command and Management component within NIMS is designed to enable effective and efficient incident management and coordination by providing a flexible, standardized incident management structure. To institutionalize these activities within a formal structure, command and management includes three fundamental elements: the Incident Command System (ICS), Multiagency Coordination Systems (MACS), and Public Information. These fundamental elements provide standardization through consistent terminology and established organizational structures.

Why is ICS needed?
When an incident requires response from multiple local emergency management and response agencies, effective cross-jurisdictional coordination using common processes and systems is critical. The Incident Command System (ICS) provides a flexible, yet standardized core mechanism for coordinated and collaborative incident management, whether for incidents where additional resources are required or are provided from different organizations within a single jurisdiction or outside the jurisdiction, or for complex incidents with national implications.

What is ICS Designed To Do?
The ICS is a widely applicable management system designed to enable effective, efficient incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure. ICS is a fundamental form of management established in a standard format, with the purpose of enabling incident managers to identify the key concerns associated with the incident—often under urgent conditions—without sacrificing attention to any component of the command system.
It represents organizational "best practices" and, as an element of the Command and Management Component of NIMS, has become the standard for emergency management across the country. Designers of the system recognized early that ICS must be interdisciplinary and organizationally flexible to meet the following management challenges:

• Meet the needs of incidents of any kind or size.
• Allow personnel from a variety of agencies to meld rapidly into a common management structure.
• Provide logistical and administrative support to operational staff.
• Be cost effective by avoiding duplication of efforts.
ICS consists of procedures for controlling personnel, facilities, equipment, and communications. It is a system designed to be used or applied from the time an incident occurs until the requirement for management and operations no longer exists.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) FAQ's:

What is Recognition of Prior Learning?

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a performance-based evaluation process to assess an individual’s prior experiences and training to determine competency in a position. This is based on the premise that the candidate has already performed the job or performed in a position very similar to the one desired. RPL is the process whereby an individual provides documentation of their experiences, training, and knowledge and, if necessary, is confirmed with an interview panel consisting of subject matter experts (SMEs) or credentialed individuals. The Historical Recognition process outlined in the FEMA NQS has been combined with additional elements of the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process outlined in the IIMQS and is referred to as the RPL process within TIMQS. See Section V, Initiating the Qualifications Process – Recognition of Prior Learning.

Why is Recognition of Prior Learning important?

RPL provides the AHIMT program with a working list of qualified evaluators who are authorized to sign position task books in support of AHIMT development.  RPL is the initial step towards initiating the position task book process.

Who should apply for RPL?

Candidates who have already performed the job or performed in a position very similar to the one desired.  If the individual has the required supporting documentation of their experiences, training, and knowledge they may be an excellent candidate for RPL.

How many times can I apply for RPL?

RPL requires that the candidate apply for RPL for each position being sought.  All applications must be received by 7/1/2022.  After 7/1/2022, RPL will open only for newly added positions or individuals who become newly employed or sponsored by an organization participating in the TIMQS program and who has existing ICS position qualification from their previous employer or sponsor.

If my application is rejected, then what?

Candidates for RPL whose applications are rejected will receive a form letter from the Credentialing and Qualifications Committee (CQC) Secretary, listing out the areas for improvement that must be addressed for the RPL process to continue.  The candidate will have one opportunity to make corrections, modifications, or supply requested documentation.  If the areas for improvement are addressed, the CQC will move for approvals.  If the areas are not addressed or are received incomplete, the CQC will finalize the rejection and the candidate will be required to work through the Position Task Book process for qualification.

Regional Team Member FAQ's:

How do I get a Position Task Book?

Individual discusses their desire to train for a new/higher position with employing or sponsoring entity or AHIMT leadership. On concurrence of supervisor, the Position Candidate notifies TEMC of their desire to train for a new NIMS ICS position by submitting a Request for Change of Credential Status (RCCS) Form signed by their employing or sponsoring supervisor.

Position Candidate applies for, attends, and completes prerequisite training and attains any prerequisite qualifications. The Position Candidate completes NIMS Core Curriculum specific to their level and attains any prerequisite experience and/or qualification criteria for the position as identified in the appropriate PQR.

Once the Position Candidate starts their required training, a PTB for the target position the individual is working towards is initiated by the Chair of the TEMC or their designee. Position Candidates who have initiated PTBs are identified as “Trainees” for the position and are permitted to function as trainees on qualifying incidents and events. *PTBs that have not been issued by the Chair of the TEMC or their designee will be considered invalid.

What Position Task Books will be used for TIMQS?

The TIMQS adopted the AHIMTA Position Task Books (PTBs) for use in its qualifications system. The AHIMTA PTBs provides a more robust evaluative process, particularly when addressing the knowledge, skills, and abilities that should be evaluated when an individual is working on a Direct Entry position. The TIMQS-adopted PTBs and the evaluation criteria and processes all exceed FEMA NQS guidelines.

What are the Position Task Book codes and what do they mean?

Each task in a PTB has at least one code associated with the situation(s) within which the task MUST be completed. Performance of any task in a situation(s) other than that required by the task’s code(s) is not valid for qualification.

If more than one code is listed, the task may be completed in any of the situations (e.g., if codes I1, I2, and O1 are listed, the task may be completed in any of the three situations).

Definitions for these codes are:
I1 = Task must be performed on an incident which meets the following criteria:
• Is managed under the Incident Command System (ICS)
• Requires a written Incident Action Plan (IAP)
• Requires using the Planning P to plan for multiple operational periods
• Matches or is higher complexity level (see Appendix A, Incident Complexity) than the type rating being pursued

I2 = Task can be performed in the following situations:
• Incident
• Incident within an Event or Incident that meets the following criteria:
o Is a critical time-pressured, high-consequence incident managed under the Incident Command System (ICS)
o May only be one operational period and without a formal written IAP
o Matches or is higher complexity level than the complexity rating being pursued (see Appendix A, Incident Complexity)

O1 = Task can be performed in the following situations:
• Planned Event
• “Full-Scale Exercise” or “Functional Exercise” as defined by HSEEP; see TIMQS Section X, Qualifying Incident, Event, and Exercise Guidelines
• The situations listed above must meet the following criteria:
o They are managed under the Incident Command System (ICS)
o The complexity level is the same or a higher complexity level than the complexity level rating being pursued. See Appendix A, Incident Complexity
o Requires a formal written Incident or Event Action Plan (IAP/EAP)
o Requires using the Planning P to plan for multiple operational periods
o For an Event, requires contingency planning for an Incident within the Event

O2 = Task can be performed in the following situations if the situation affords the opportunity to evaluate the knowledge/skills associated with the ICS position:
• Planned Event
• Exercise
• Training
• Daily Job

R = Rare events
• These seldom occur and opportunities to evaluate trainee performance in real settings are limited. Examples of rare events include accidents; injuries; and vehicle and aircraft crashes. Through interviews, the Evaluator may be able to determine if the trainee could perform the task in a real situation.

Who can sign my Position Task Book?

To be qualified as a Coach or Evaluator for Task Codes “I1,” “I2,” “O1,” and “R” in the PTB:

a) The individual must be qualified in the position being coached or evaluated; or the individual must be qualified in a position that, within the ICS organizational structure, supervises the position being coached or evaluated.

b) It is recommended that the Coach/Evaluator have previously performed successfully as a fully qualified individual on two separate Qualifying Incidents or Qualifying Exercises prior to serving as a Coach/Evaluator.

Task Code “O2” in the PTB may be evaluated in other situations. Examples include in a classroom by an instructor(s), usually qualified as described in “1” above, or during the course of daily work by a day-to-day supervisor

Am I qualified if I take the position specific course?

Training courses are a valuable part of the qualification process, but taking a course alone will not qualify you in position.  To qualify in position, please reference the Position Task Book process as defined in TIMQS.

What if I have the position specific course and O305?

Training courses are a valuable part of the qualification process, but taking a position specific course and O305 will not qualify you in a position.  To qualify in position please reference the Position Task Book process as defined in TIMQS.

Can I participate without the support of my home agency?

All trainees, candidates, and team members are required to have the support of their home agency.  Support of your home agency is integral to future program and team success.

What if I am not assigned the position that I want?

Each team has a limited number of positions and each position has a limited volume for rostering.  While teams will often staff bench depth of at least three persons at every position, it is critical for the team to fill each of the roles on the roster.  While you may not receive your preferred initial assignment, if you are an actively engaged participant on the team you may be afforded additional opportunities in the future to qualify in the role you desire.