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Five Alabama Residents Charged with TennCare Fraud

Monday, June 17, 2019 | 09:16am

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Five residents of Alabama are each charged in separate indictments with TennCare fraud.

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) today announced the indictments, which accuse the five of claiming to live in Tennessee when in fact they were residing in Alabama which would have disqualified them for enrollment healthcare insurance benefits through the program.

“Providing false information in order to personally gain TennCare benefits is a crime,” Inspector General Kim Harmon said.  “The Office of Inspector General works diligently to deter TennCare fraud and to protect its resources.”

The five, all from Bridgeport, Alabama, are charged with TennCare fraud and theft of services:

  • Bradley Parker, 45, who authorities say fraudulently reported to the state that he and his minor child were residents of Tennessee in order to be eligible for TennCare benefits, when in fact they were living in Bridgeport, Alabama.
  • Amber Parrish, 23, accused of claiming that she and her minor child were residents of Tennessee in order to be eligible for TennCare benefits.
  • Robin Miller, 31, charged with reporting that she and her minor child were residents of Tennessee in order to receive TennCare benefits.
  • Cassandra Henry, 29, accused of falsely reporting that she and her minor child were residents of Tennessee in order to receive TennCare benefits.
  • Jacqueline Shrum, 32, accused of falsely reporting that she and her minor child were residents of Tennessee in order to receive TennCare benefits.

These five arrests bring the total number of people arrested for TennCare fraud to 3,100 since the Office of Inspector General (OIG) began investigating and pursuing this criminal activity.

District Attorney General J. Michael Taylor is prosecuting. TennCare fraud is a Class D felony punishable by up to four years in prison per charge.

The OIG, which is separate from TennCare, began full operation in February 2005 and has investigated cases leading to more than $3 million being repaid to TennCare, with a total estimated cost avoidance of more than $163.6 million for TennCare, according to latest figures. To date, 3,102 people have been charged with TennCare fraud.

Through the OIG Cash for Tips Program established by the Legislature, Tennesseans can get cash rewards for TennCare fraud tips that lead to convictions.  Anyone can report suspected TennCare fraud by calling 1-800-433-3982, toll-free, from anywhere in Tennessee; or log on to www.tn.gov/tnoig/ and follow the prompts that read “Report TennCare Fraud.”