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ADVISORY CONCERNING ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES, THE PRACTICE OF “VAPING,” “JUULING” AND USE OF OTHER ELECTRONIC NICOTINE DELIVERY SYSTEMS OR ENDS

Rubella (German Measles)

Reportable by Providers and laboratories
Rubella (German Measles)

Infectious agent:  Rubella virus


Description of illness: Rubella is a brief, vaccine-preventable viral illness characterized by a mild maculopapular rash that is rare in the United States but can be introduced by ill travelers. The rubella rash occurs in 50%-80% of rubella-infected persons and is sometimes misdiagnosed as measles or scarlet fever. Children usually develop few or no symptoms, but adults may experience a 1-5 day prodrome of low-grade fever, headache, malaise, mild coryza, and conjunctivitis.  Arthritis occurs in up to 70% of infected women, but is rare in men or children. Rubella is a contagious illness transmitted through direct or droplet contact from nasopharyngeal secretions with an incubation period of 17 days (range: 12-23 days). A person is most infectious when rash is erupting, but can shed the virus from 7 days before to 7 days after rash onset.  The most serious complication from rubella is the harm an infection can cause an unvaccinated pregnant woman’s developing baby, complications includes: miscarriage; stillbirths; and severe birth defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS).