Skip to Main Content

Asian Longhorned Beetle

Asian Longhorned Beetle

Introduction

The Asian longhorned beetle is large (1-1½” long) with white spots and long antennae. This insect is native to China and Korea, and was found in the U.S. in 1996. Currently, populations exist only in Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada, though infestations have been detected and eradicated in Illinois and New Jersey. Beetles are often inadvertently moved to new places in cut firewood. Adults lay eggs in many hardwood species (especially maples), and larvae burrow into and develop in the wood and cambium. Larval tunneling greatly reduces the tree’s strength, making infested trees windthrow hazards. Adults chew perfectly round (~¼” diameter) holes when they exit the tree. Trees infested with Asian longhorned beetle may show unseasonable yellowing or dropping leaves, sap seeping from the bark, or dead or dying branches. There is no known treatment once a tree is infested.​

Identification

The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) is large (1-1½” long) with white spots and long antennae. Adults chew perfectly round (~¼” diameter) holes when they exit the tree. Trees infested with Asian longhorned beetle may show unseasonable yellowing or dropping leaves, sap seeping from the bark, or dead or dying branches.

Current Situation

This insect is native to China and Korea, and was found in the U.S. in 1996. Currently, populations exist only in Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada, though infestations have been detected and eradicated in Illinois and New Jersey.

Management

What Can You Do?

Resources

 

Contacts

Nathan Hoover

Forest Health Forester
(615) 289-7373
Nathan.Hoover@tn.gov

Related Links