Skip to Main Content

National Register

The National Register of Historic Places is the Nation's list of cultural resources considered worthy of preservation. In Tennessee, the staff of the Tennessee Historical Commission administers this program. Three times a year, the State Review Board meets to recommend properties for listing in the National Register.

There are over 2000 entries in the National Register from Tennessee. Every county in the state has at least one entry. For additional information on the National Register program, contact the Tennessee Historical Commission at 615/532-1550 or the National Register of Historic Places.

Clover Bottom Farm - Nashville - Davidson County

thc_national-reg_cloverbottom1

Clover Bottom Mansion was listed in 1975 as an excellent local example of the Italianate style. The current nomination changes the name of the National Register listing, expands the boundaries and adds more information on the importance of the property. Settled in 1797 by the Hoggatt family, new documentation in the nomination details the agricultural importance of the farm and the significant role of enslaved African Americans. One of the larger farms in the area, changing farming methods and crops are represented by the landscape and agricultural outbuildings on the property. Recent fieldwork documented the historic archaeological value of the farm. This study adds information not found in the written records and presents a more complete picture of what life on the farm was like when it was a working farm. The state of Tennessee bought the farm in 1949 and used it as an institutional farm and for housing. Unused since 1980, in 1994 the mansion became the offices of the Tennessee Historical Commission staff.

T. B. Sutton General Store - Granville -  Jackson County County

file

The T.B. Sutton General Store was built in Granville in 1880 and purchased by Thomas Benjamin Sutton in 1925. During most of the time the store operated you could purchase dry goods, groceries, agricultural products, get a haircut and much more. The “whittling porch” on the façade was a favorite place for people to visit. Sutton stopped operating the store in 1968, and although it was open for a few more years, it was no longer the commercial and social center of the town. The changes in transportation and construction of the Center Hill Dam meant fewer people lived in or traveled to the area. In disrepair, the 2-story weatherboarded store was extensively renovated around 2000. This occurred at the same time others were looking at the potential for renovating buildings in the town and beginning “Granville Heritage Day.” In 2007 the owners donated the store building to Historic Granville Incorporated. Today, the store is the center of a thriving heritage tourism industry in Granville.

U. S. Marine Hospital - Memphis - Shelby County 

thc_national-reg_usmarine1

Three buildings and one structure associated with the former U.S. Marine Hospital are representative of important trends in architecture and health and medicine in Memphis in the late 19th to mid-20th century. The US Marine Hospital Building was built in 1934 and 1937. The 3-story plus raised basement Colonial Revival hospital is the principal building in the complex. Designed in a broad y-shape, the brick building is embellished with limestone detailing. Built in 1884 and listed in the National Register in 1980, the 2-story plus raised basement Nurses quarters/laundry and kitchen building reflects the Italianate style. It was moved to its current location circa 1936 when newer buildings in the complex were constructed. Also included in the nomination are a support building, the 1939 steam laundry building and the 1930s ornamental metal fence that delineates much of the property. Plans are to adaptively rese the building taking advantage of the federal preservation tax incentives.

Contacts

Rebecca Schmitt

(615) 770-1086 

Rebecca.Schmitt@tn.gov  

 

Holly M. Barnett

(615) 770-1098
Holly.M.Barnett@tn.gov