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The Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

Note: Only a trained medical professional can correctly diagnose Alzheimer's Disease. Do not rely on the following information alone.

Memory loss

Forgetting bits of information is more frequent and the chances of remembering are less.

Routine tasks become unfamiliar 

Most of our daily activities are so commonplace and habitual that we don't even think of how to go about doing them (i.e. making a cup of coffee), but the Alzheimer's patient will no longer remember how to do those basic daily activities.

Disorientation 

Getting lost on one’s own street is characteristic of Alzheimer's-associated disorientation. Alzheimer's can make it difficult for people to remember how they arrived where they are or how to return to a starting point, including home.

Poor judgment

People suffering with Alzheimer's disassociate actions from reason. For example, they may not dress according to the weather, or they may handle money improperly, even giving it away or spending it on unneeded items. 

Problems with abstract thinking

An Alzheimer's sufferer may no longer recognize something as basic as numbers when attempting to do simple, lifelong tasks like adding. 

Misplacing things

Though any person may do this from time to time, the person with Alzheimer's will misplace things in unusual locations, such as putting a piece of jewelry in the freezer or an iron in the sink. 

Moodiness

The mood changes are often sudden and unexplainable. A person might go from a relaxed state to a highly agitated one.

Personality changes

The person you knew becomes someone totally different. An independent person becomes dependent. A confident person becomes someone who is confused and fearful.

Lethargy

This can manifest itself in apparent fatigue or disinterest in routine activities.


Do you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself or a loved one? If so, it's time to consult a physician. The sooner the disease is diagnosed, the sooner proper treatment, care and support services can be put in place. 

Source: www.alz.org